Reiki and Traditional Chinese Medicine

By MartaR @Divinefrequencies.net


By letting go it all gets done” ~ Lao Tzu









One may ask what Reiki and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) have in common, but those who practice any energy medicine know that both, Reiki and TCM are focusing on balance of the human body, mind, and spirit. Although each uses different means, both of those methods place emphasis on restoring our bodies to their harmonious state.


TCM has been around for more than 4000 years, and its philosophy is based on Taoist principles of balance and harmony of humans with their natural environment. The balance was important in all aspects of human lives, from diet, exercise, emotions to the mind, and preventative measures played key role, so that illness had no chance to develop.


Reiki principals are very similar in nature. Connecting to the highest energy of Source of All That Is has the power to balance all aspects of our lives – mental, emotional, and physical. And BALANCE is the common denominator in both practices.


September equinox is the beginning of the fall, in northern hemisphere. On September 22 the day and night are roughly the same length and from that time moving forward, days will get shorter, and nights will be longer. Summer is over and fall is the time to prepare and strengthen our bodies for winter.

According to TCM, fall is associated with the element of Metal. The emotions connected with Metal are grief and sadness. The climate associated with Metal is dry, the organs associated with Metal are Lungs and Large Intestine. The sense connected with Metal is smell / nose.


While nature prepares for period of rest and hibernation, so should we by focusing more on slowing down and on that which is inward – preparing physically and emotionally for letting go. It is important to release physical toxins to boost our immunity and release our grief, guilt and emotional “baggage” to allow for new things to blossom in our lives.


To support those fall organs – Lungs and Large Intestine, which are responsible for oxygenating our body and removing waste, we should remember three things: dress warm, eat warm foods and drink plenty of warm water.

Wear a scarf! The back of the neck is particularly vulnerable to invasion by wind and cold. In fact, the Chinese call wind the Master of 100 illnesses. So, protect yourself from the wind and the cold. Also, use seasonal fruits and vegetables (apples, squashes, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower), and … you guessed it … prepare warm meals.


Practice deep breathing exercises. They strengthen the lungs. And to conserve the emotional energy – prepare to let go of everything that holds resentful, burdening, and sorrowful feelings. You can write it all on paper and burn it in the fire pit to let it go literally and emotionally.


While you’re at fall sorting and winter preparations, don’t forget to have fun and admire changing colors, temperature, and textures of nature. We are integral part of it and may as well enjoy the process :)


Practice this in fall “When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be” (Lao Tzu) and you find yourself becoming a new person in spring!


With love and blessings,

Marta


References:

https://www.crossingpointacupuncture.com/

https://www.actcm.edu/about-us

https://www.chinesemedicineliving.com/

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